Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 1 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Presence (Page: 1132)

Pres"ence (?), n. [F. présence, L. praesentia. See Present.]

1. The state of being present, or of being within sight or call, or at hand; -- opposed to absence.

2. The place in which one is present; the part of space within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood without the intervention of anything that forbids intercourse.

Wrath shell be no more Thenceforth, but in thy presence joy entire. Milton.

3. Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.

In such a presence here to plead my thoughts. Shak.
An't please your grace, the two great cardinals. Wait in the presence. Shak.

4. The whole of the personal qualities of an individual; person; personality; especially, the person of a superior, as a sovereign.

The Sovran Presence thus replied. Milton.

5. An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility; noble company.

Odmar, of all this presence does contain, Give her your wreath whom you esteem most fair. Dryden.

6. Port, mien; air; personal appearence. Rather dignity of presence than beauty of aspect." Bacon.

A graceful presence bespeaks acceptance. Collier.
Presence chamber, ∨ Presence room, the room in which a great personage receives company. Addison. Chambers of presence." Bacon. -- Presence of mind, that state of the mind in which all its faculties are alert, prompt, and acting harmoniously in obedience to the will, enabling one to reach, as it were spontaneously or by intuition, just conclusions in sudden emergencies.