Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 1 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Mixture (Page: 933)

Mix"ture (?), n. [L. mixtura, fr. miscere, mixtum, to mix: cf. F. mixture. See Mix.]

1. The act of mixing, or the state of being mixed; as, made by a mixture of ingredients. Hooker.

2. That which results from mixing different ingredients together; a compound; as, to drink a mixture of molasses and water; -- also, a medley.

There is also a mixture of good and evil wisely distributed by God, to serve the ends of his providence. Atterbury.

3. An ingredient entering into a mixed mass; an additional ingredient.

Cicero doubts whether it were possible for a community to exist that had not a prevailing mixture of piety in its constitution. Addison.

4. (Med.) A kind of liquid medicine made up of many ingredients; esp., as opposed to solution, a liquid preparation in which the solid ingredients are not completely dissolved.

5. (Physics & Chem.) A mass of two or more ingredients, the particles of which are separable, independent, and uncompounded with each other, no matter how thoroughly and finely commingled; -- contrasted with a compound; thus, gunpowder is a mechanical mixture of carbon, sulphur, and niter.

6. (Mus.) An organ stop, comprising from two to five ranges of pipes, used only in combination with the foundation and compound stops; -- called also furniture stop. It consists of high harmonics, or overtones, of the ground tone. Syn. -- Union; admixture; intermixture; medley.