Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 2 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Inferior (Page: 759)

In*fe"ri*or (?), a. [L., compar. of inferus that is below, underneath, the lower; akin to E. under: cf. F. inférieur. See Under.]

1. Lower in place, rank, excellence, etc.; less important or valuable; subordinate; underneath; beneath.

A thousand inferior and particular propositions. I. Watts.
The body, or, as some love to call it, our inferior nature. Burke.
Whether they are equal or inferior to my other poems, an author is the most improper judge. Dryden.

2. Poor or mediocre; as, an inferior quality of goods.

3. (Astron.) (a) Nearer the sun than the earth is; as, the inferior or interior planets; an inferior conjunction of Mercury or Venus. (b) Below the horizon; as, the inferior part of a meridian,

4. (Bot.) (a) Situated below some other organ; -- said of a calyx when free from the ovary, and therefore below it, or of an ovary with an adherent and therefore inferior calyx. (b) On the side of a flower which is next the bract; anterior.

5. (Min.) Junior or subordinate in rank; as, an inferior officer. Inferior court (Law), a court subject to the jurisdiction of another court known as the superior, or higher, court. -- Inferior letter, Inferior figure (Print.), a small letter or figure standing at the bottom of the line (opposed to superior letter or figure), as in A2, Bn, 2 and n are inferior characters. -- Inferior tide, the tide corresponding to the moon's transit of the meridian, when below the horizon.


Inferior (Page: 759)

In*fe"ri*or, n. A person lower in station, rank, intellect, etc., than another.

A great person gets more by obliging his inferior than by disdaining him. South.