Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 1 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Imposition (Page: 737)

Im`po*si"tion (?), n. [F., fr. L. impositio the application of a name to a thing. See Impone.]

1. The act of imposing, laying on, affixing, enjoining, inflicting, obtruding, and the like. From imposition of strict laws." Milton.

Made more solemn by the imposition of hands. Hammond.

2. That which is imposed, levied, or enjoined; charge; burden; injunction; tax.

3. (Eng. Univ.) An extra exercise enjoined on students as a punishment. T. Warton.

4. An excessive, arbitrary, or unlawful exaction; hence, a trick or deception put on laid on others; cheating; fraud; delusion; imposture.

Reputation is an idle and most false imposition. Shak.

5. (Eccl.) The act of laying on the hands as a religious ceremoy, in ordination, confirmation, etc.

6. (Print.) The act or process of imosing pages or columns of type. See Impose, v. t., 4. Syn. -- Deceit; fraud; imposture. See Deception.