Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 1 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Happiness (Page: 669)

Hap"pi*ness, n. [From Happy.]

1. Good luck; good fortune; prosperity.

All happiness bechance to thee in Milan! Shak.

2. An agreeable feeling or condition of the soul arising from good fortune or propitious happening of any kind; the possession of those circumstances or that state of being which is attended enjoyment; the state of being happy; contentment; joyful satisfaction; felicity; blessedness.

3. Fortuitous elegance; unstudied grace; -- used especially of language.

Some beauties yet no precepts can declare, For there's a happiness, as well as care. Pope.
Syn. -- Happiness, Felicity, Blessedness, Bliss. Happiness is generic, and is applied to almost every kind of enjoyment except that of the animal appetites; felicity is a more formal word, and is used more sparingly in the same general sense, but with elevated associations; blessedness is applied to the most refined enjoyment arising from the purest social, benevolent, and religious affections; bliss denotes still more exalted delight, and is applied more appropriately to the joy anticipated in heaven.
O happiness! our being's end and aim! Pope.
Others in virtue place felicity, But virtue joined with riches and long life; In corporal pleasures he, and careless ease. Milton.
His overthrow heaped happiness upon him; For then, and not till then, he felt himself, And found the blessedness of being little. Shak.