Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913 + 1828)


Displaying 2 result(s) from the 1913 edition:
Complex (Page: 290)

Com"plex (?), a. [L. complexus, p. p. of complecti to entwine around, comprise; com- + plectere to twist, akin to plicare to fold. See Plait, n.]

1. Composed of two or more parts; composite; not simple; as, a complex being; a complex idea.

Ideas thus made up of several simple ones put together, I call complex; such as beauty, gratitude, a man, an army, the universe. Locke.

2. Involving many parts; complicated; intricate.

When the actual motions of the heavens are calculated in the best possible way, the process is difficult and complex. Whewell.
Complex fraction. See Fraction. -- Complex number (Math.), in the theory of numbers, an expression of the form a + b&root;-1, when a and b are ordinary integers. Syn. -- See Intricate.
Complex (Page: 290)

Com"plex, n. [L. complexus] Assemblage of related things; colletion; complication.

This parable of the wedding supper comprehends in it the whole complex of all the blessings and privileges exhibited by the gospel. South.
Complex of lines (Geom.), all the possible straight lines in space being considered, the entire system of lines which satisfy a single relation constitute a complex; as, all the lines which meet a given curve make up a complex. The lines which satisfy two relations constitute a congruency of lines; as, the entire system of lines, each one of which meets two given surfaces, is a congruency. [291]